Top Swift Design Patterns for iOS App Development in 2024

Top Swift Design Patterns

for iOS App Development

in 2024

By Ronald Tuch

By Ronald Tuch

Top design patterns in Swift

Swift design patterns give easy solutions to common development challenges. They’re a popular way of creating new iOS apps quickly and reliably.

In this article, we’ll cover the top Swift design patterns for iOS app development in 2024.

We’ll guide you through the most used iOS design patterns, explore their usage, and list some source code examples.

Keep reading!

What Are Swift Design Patterns?

Swift design patterns provide streamlined solutions to common software design problems. They’re reusable templates for recurring situations in apps. With their help, software engineers can create well-constructed and scalable code much faster. The code is also easier to understand by other developers, making its maintenance a breeze.

Keep in mind that although Swift design patterns are reusable, they’re not pieces of code you can simply copy and paste to produce an app.

What Are the Benefits of Using Swift Design Patterns?

Using Swift design patterns allows software developers to write well-optimized code and create top-notch apps much faster.

The code created using design patterns is reusable and easier to understand by other developers. This makes it scalable and easy to debug and maintain. This means that apps can be created faster and updated more often.

What Are the Design Pattern Types in iOS App Development?

developer work on the different design pattern types for Swift.

Swift design patterns fall into three categories: Creational Design Pattern, Structural Design Pattern, and Behavioral Design Pattern.

The difference is in the level of detail, complexity, and applicability to the system.

Let’s have a look at the individual categories:

1. Creational Design Patterns

The Creational Design Patterns in Swift are used for handling objects.

For example, you can use these patterns for creating objects and initializing them. Another example is making sure only one instance of a class exists. This way, developers can manage global resources like network traffic and caching.

2. Structural Design Patterns

The Structural Design Patterns in Swift are used for associating classes and objects. Their goal is to simplify the design and help organize it better.

By using Structural Design Patterns, developers can build complex relationships between objects. This allows them to create scalable applications and promote code reuse. The Structural Design Patterns also help software engineers understand complex systems easily.

3. Behavioral Design Patterns

The Behavioral Design Patterns in Swift handle the communication between objects. They’re responsible for defining the behavior of objects and simplifying their interaction.

For example, one behavioral pattern deals with one-to-many relationships between objects. Meanwhile, another helps delegate tasks from one object to another.

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What Are the Frequently Used Design Patterns in iOS Apps?

There are many frequently used design patterns in Swift for iOS here are just a few.

Now that we’ve covered the categories, let’s explore the most frequently used design patterns in native iOS app development.

1. Adapter Pattern

The Adapter is a structural Swift design pattern, which helps incompatible objects interact.

When building iOS apps, adapter patterns are used for adapting existing APIs or libraries.

These patterns act as wrappers, adapting interfaces from one object to another. They format the calls from one object in an interface that’s recognizable by the second object.

When to Use?

To help incompatible objects interact.

Example

// Adaptee: The existing class with an incompatible interface
class Adaptee {
    func specificRequest() -> String {
        return "Adaptee's specific request"
    }
}
// Target: The interface that the client expects
protocol Target {
    func request() -> String
}
// Adapter: Adapts the Adaptee's interface to the Target interface
class Adapter: Target {
    private let adaptee: Adaptee
    
    init(adaptee: Adaptee) {
        self.adaptee = adaptee
    }
    
    func request() -> String {
        return "Adapter: " + adaptee.specificRequest()
    }
}
// Client code
let adaptee = Adaptee()
let adapter = Adapter(adaptee: adaptee)
let result = adapter.request()
print(result) // Output: "Adapter: Adaptee's specific request"

2. Bridge Pattern

The Bridge pattern is a structural design pattern in Swift, which handles class hierarchies.

By using this pattern, developers can separate classes by their abstraction and implementation. This means that these two elements can then be modified independently.

The idea is to reduce the complexity of the app. Instead of creating new types every time new functionality is required, developers can code that functionality into its own classes. They can then combine it with existing objects at runtime.

When to Use?

To add new functionality to existing classes.

Example

// Abstraction
protocol Shape {
    var color: Color { get set }
    func draw() -> String
}
// Concrete Abstraction
class Circle: Shape {
    var color: Color
    
    init(color: Color) {
        self.color = color
    }
    
    func draw() -> String {
        return "Drawing a \(color.description) circle"
    }
}
class Square: Shape {
    var color: Color
    
    init(color: Color) {
        self.color = color
    }
    
    func draw() -> String {
        return "Drawing a \(color.description) square"
    }
}
// Implementor
protocol Color {
    var description: String { get }
}
// Concrete Implementor
class RedColor: Color {
    var description: String {
        return "Red"
    }
}
class BlueColor: Color {
    var description: String {
        return "Blue"
    }
}
// Client
let redColor = RedColor()
let blueColor = BlueColor()
let redCircle = Circle(color: redColor)
let blueSquare = Square(color: blueColor)
print(redCircle.draw())  // Output: "Drawing a Red circle"
print(blueSquare.draw()) // Output: "Drawing a Blue square"

3. Builder Pattern

The Builder is a creational design pattern in Swift. It helps create and configure complex objects in steps.

This pattern is one of the most used in Swift programming. It breaks down the process of object creation, hence simplifying it.

The builder pattern allows developers to reuse code and avoid unnecessary steps. This helps apps create more complex objects faster.

This pattern is extremely useful when you want to create objects but don’t have all the information available from the beginning. You can start creating with whatever info you have and continue building the object as new information arrives.

When to Use?

To build complex objects step by step.

Example

// Product
struct Pizza {
    let dough: String
    let sauce: String
    let toppings: [String]
    
    func description() -> String {
        var result = "Pizza with \(dough) dough, \(sauce) sauce"
        if !toppings.isEmpty {
            result += ", and toppings: \(toppings.joined(separator: ", "))"
        }
        return result
    }
}
// Builder
protocol PizzaBuilder {
    func setDough(_ dough: String)
    func setSauce(_ sauce: String)
    func addTopping(_ topping: String)
    func build() -> Pizza
}
// Concrete Builder
class MargheritaPizzaBuilder: PizzaBuilder {
    private var pizza: Pizza
    
    init() {
        pizza = Pizza(dough: "", sauce: "", toppings: [])
    }
    
    func setDough(_ dough: String) {
        pizza.dough = dough
    }
    
    func setSauce(_ sauce: String) {
        pizza.sauce = sauce
    }
    
    func addTopping(_ topping: String) {
        pizza.toppings.append(topping)
    }
    
    func build() -> Pizza {
        return pizza
    }
}
// Director
class PizzaDirector {
    private var builder: PizzaBuilder
    
    init(builder: PizzaBuilder) {
        self.builder = builder
    }
    
    func constructPizza() -> Pizza {
        builder.setDough("thin")
        builder.setSauce("tomato")
        builder.addTopping("cheese")
        return builder.build()
    }
}
// Client
let margheritaBuilder = MargheritaPizzaBuilder()
let director = PizzaDirector(builder: margheritaBuilder)
let margheritaPizza = director.constructPizza()
print(margheritaPizza.description()) // Output: "Pizza with thin dough, tomato sauce, and toppings: cheese"

4. Command Pattern

The Command pattern is a behavioral Swift design pattern. It turns a request or an operation into an object, which contains all the required information.

Using command patterns lets you introduce new commands into iOS apps without messing with the existing code.

This pattern is very versatile and widely used by iOS app developers. The conversion allows postponed or remote execution of commands. By turning requests into objects, you can store the request history, repeat executions, or search them, for example. You can also delay, queue, or revert an operation if needed.

When to Use?

To turn requests into objects to reuse and manipulate them easily.

Example

// Receiver
class Light {
    func turnOn() {
        print("Light is on")
    }
    
    func turnOff() {
        print("Light is off")
    }
}
// Command
protocol Command {
    func execute()
}
// Concrete Command
class TurnOnCommand: Command {
    private let light: Light
    
    init(light: Light) {
        self.light = light
    }
    
    func execute() {
        light.turnOn()
    }
}
class TurnOffCommand: Command {
    private let light: Light
    
    init(light: Light) {
        self.light = light
    }
    
    func execute() {
        light.turnOff()
    }
}
// Invoker
class RemoteControl {
    private var command: Command?
    
    func setCommand(command: Command) {
        self.command = command
    }
    
    func pressButton() {
        command?.execute()
    }
}
// Client
let light = Light()
let turnOnCommand = TurnOnCommand(light: light)
let turnOffCommand = TurnOffCommand(light: light)
let remoteControl = RemoteControl()
remoteControl.setCommand(command: turnOnCommand)
remoteControl.pressButton() // Output: "Light is on"
remoteControl.setCommand(command: turnOffCommand)
remoteControl.pressButton() // Output: "Light is off"

5. Decorator Pattern

The decorator patterns is a structural design pattern in Swift

Decorator patterns in Swift are structural design patterns. The purpose of these patterns is to dynamically change an object’s behavior without affecting other objects of the same class.

By using decorator patterns, you can add additional features or responsibilities to objects. This is achieved by wrapping them. Hence, this pattern is often also called a wrapper design pattern. This approach allows incremental changes to an object’s behavior at runtime.

The decorator design pattern is very useful when utilizing third-party libraries. You can use it, for example, for encryption and decryption of data.

When to Use?

To add additional features or responsibilities to objects and change their behavior at runtime.

Example

// Component
protocol Coffee {
    func getCost() -> Double
    func getDescription() -> String
}
// Concrete Component
class SimpleCoffee: Coffee {
    func getCost() -> Double {
        return 1.0
    }
    
    func getDescription() -> String {
        return "Simple coffee"
    }
}
// Decorator
class CoffeeDecorator: Coffee {
    private let decoratedCoffee: Coffee
    
    init(decoratedCoffee: Coffee) {
        self.decoratedCoffee = decoratedCoffee
    }
    
    func getCost() -> Double {
        return decoratedCoffee.getCost()
    }
    
    func getDescription() -> String {
        return decoratedCoffee.getDescription()
    }
}
// Concrete Decorators
class MilkDecorator: CoffeeDecorator {
    override func getCost() -> Double {
        return super.getCost() + 0.5
    }
    
    override func getDescription() -> String {
        return super.getDescription() + ", with milk"
    }
}
class WhipDecorator: CoffeeDecorator {
    override func getCost() -> Double {
        return super.getCost() + 0.7
    }
    
    override func getDescription() -> String {
        return super.getDescription() + ", with whipped cream"
    }
}
// Client
let simpleCoffee: Coffee = SimpleCoffee()
print("Cost: \(simpleCoffee.getCost()), Description: \(simpleCoffee.getDescription())")
let coffeeWithMilk: Coffee = MilkDecorator(decoratedCoffee: simpleCoffee)
print("Cost: \(coffeeWithMilk.getCost()), Description: \(coffeeWithMilk.getDescription())")
let coffeeWithWhip: Coffee = WhipDecorator(decoratedCoffee: simpleCoffee)
print("Cost: \(coffeeWithWhip.getCost()), Description: \(coffeeWithWhip.getDescription())")
let coffeeWithMilkAndWhip: Coffee = WhipDecorator(decoratedCoffee: coffeeWithMilk)
print("Cost: \(coffeeWithMilkAndWhip.getCost()), Description: \(coffeeWithMilkAndWhip.getDescription())")

6. Facade Pattern

The Facade design pattern is a structural pattern in Swift. It provides a simplified interface to a complex set of classes, libraries, or frameworks.

Facade patterns might provide limited functionality if working with the original system. However, they will only give you access to the features you need, ignoring the rest of the system’s more complicated capabilities.

The benefit of using a facade pattern is that it decreases the complexity of the application. It also reduces the amount of resources needed to execute. These design patterns also assist in lowering undesired dependencies.

When to Use?

To provide a simplified interface to systems and reduce the complexity of the application.

Example

// Subsystem 1
class Engine {
    func start() {
        print("Engine started")
    }
    
    func stop() {
        print("Engine stopped")
    }
}
// Subsystem 2
class AirConditioner {
    func turnOn() {
        print("Air conditioner turned on")
    }
    
    func turnOff() {
        print("Air conditioner turned off")
    }
}
// Facade
class CarFacade {
    private let engine: Engine
    private let airConditioner: AirConditioner
    
    init() {
        engine = Engine()
        airConditioner = AirConditioner()
    }
    
    func startCar() {
        engine.start()
        airConditioner.turnOn()
        print("Car started and air conditioner turned on")
    }
    
    func stopCar() {
        engine.stop()
        airConditioner.turnOff()
        print("Car stopped and air conditioner turned off")
    }
}
// Client
let carFacade = CarFacade()
carFacade.startCar()
carFacade.stopCar()

7. Factory Method Pattern

The Factory patterns are creational Swift design patterns. They provide a means of creating objects without specifying their exact class.

Factory patterns are useful when you don’t know the exact class of objects that will be created during runtime. So, instead of creating objects of a defined class, you’ll use a superclass and a set of input parameters.

This technique lets you pick between a global method class and a base class. Objects returned by a factory method are often called products.

When to Use?

To create objects during runtime without specifying their class.

Example

// Product
protocol Animal {
    func makeSound()
}
// Concrete Products
class Dog: Animal {
    func makeSound() {
        print("Woof!")
    }
}
class Cat: Animal {
    func makeSound() {
        print("Meow!")
    }
}
// Creator
protocol AnimalFactory {
    func createAnimal() -> Animal
}
// Concrete Creators
class DogFactory: AnimalFactory {
    func createAnimal() -> Animal {
        return Dog()
    }
}
class CatFactory: AnimalFactory {
    func createAnimal() -> Animal {
        return Cat()
    }
}
// Client
let dogFactory: AnimalFactory = DogFactory()
let catFactory: AnimalFactory = CatFactory()
let dog = dogFactory.createAnimal()
dog.makeSound() // Output: "Woof!"
let cat = catFactory.createAnimal()
cat.makeSound() // Output: "Meow!"

8. MVC Pattern

Model-View-Controller, or MVC patterns for short, are a bit different than the other Swift design patterns on this list. Some developers consider them architectural patterns rather than simple design patterns.

The difference between the two is that architectural patterns provide a blueprint for the entire system. Meanwhile, design patterns try to solve a single problem in a component or the communication between components.

Still, MVC is often listed as a Swift design pattern, so for the completeness of this list we’ve included it here. This pattern is widely used in iOS app development. Its purpose is to divide the responsibilities of an app in different sectors based on their intent.

The sectors have three distinctive roles:

  • Model: This part of the pattern stores and describes how to handle the data from the iOS app.
  • View: This portion manages the visual representation of the data and handles user interactions.
  • Controller: This component is the bridge between the app’s tasks. It accesses the data from the model, processes the user input, and uses the view to display the outcome.

When to Use?

To divide the app’s responsibilities into sections based on their purpose.

Example

// Model
class UserModel {
    var name: String
    
    init(name: String) {
        self.name = name
    }
}
// View
class UserView {
    func displayUserDetails(name: String) {
        print("User details: \(name)")
    }
}
// Controller
class UserController {
    private let userModel: UserModel
    private let userView: UserView
    
    init(userModel: UserModel, userView: UserView) {
        self.userModel = userModel
        self.userView = userView
    }
    
    func updateUserView() {
        let userName = userModel.name
        userView.displayUserDetails(name: userName)
    }
    
    func setUserName(name: String) {
        userModel.name = name
    }
}
// Usage
let userModel = UserModel(name: "John")
let userView = UserView()
let userController = UserController(userModel: userModel, userView: userView)
// Initial display
userController.updateUserView()
// Update model and view
userController.setUserName(name: "Alice")
userController.updateUserView()

9. MVVM Pattern

MVVM stands for Model-View-ViewModel and is an evolution of the MVC pattern. It’s another widely used architectural pattern.

MVVC separates the development of the front-end from the back-end logic.

This means that the View handles the GUI (Graphical User Interface) elements, such as layouts, UI components, and animation. The ViewModel acts as an intermediary between the View and the Model. It processes data and provides it to the View for presentation. The Model represents the application’s data and business logic.

When to Use?

To separate the frontend from the backend logic.

Example

// Model
struct User {
    let name: String
}
// ViewModel
class UserViewModel {
    private let user: User
    
    init(user: User) {
        self.user = user
    }
    
    var userName: String {
        return user.name
    }
}
// View
import UIKit
class UserViewController: UIViewController {
    @IBOutlet weak var nameLabel: UILabel!
    
    var viewModel: UserViewModel! {
        didSet {
            updateView()
        }
    }
    
    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        updateView()
    }
    
    private func updateView() {
        nameLabel.text = viewModel.userName
    }
}
// Usage
let user = User(name: "John")
let viewModel = UserViewModel(user: user)
let viewController = UserViewController()
viewController.viewModel = viewModel

10. Observer Pattern

The Observer pattern is a behavioral Swift pattern

The Observer pattern is a behavioral Swift design pattern. It’s used to notify objects about an event that happens to an object they’re observing. It’s a subscription mechanism that’s triggered when the event occurs.

In this way, objects don’t constantly check if the state of the observed object has changed. They get notifications automatically when a change occurs.

The relationship between the objects is of the one-to-many type. The objects don’t need to know anything else about each other, except communicate the change in the observed object.

The most common practical use of this design pattern is for creating subscription services and sending notifications in iOS apps.

When to Use?

To send notifications about an event in the observed object.

Example

// Subject
protocol Subject {
    func registerObserver(observer: Observer)
    func removeObserver(observer: Observer)
    func notifyObservers()
}
// Observer
protocol Observer {
    func update(data: Any)
}
// Concrete Subject
class WeatherStation: Subject {
    private var observers: [Observer] = []
    private var temperature: Double = 0.0
    
    func registerObserver(observer: Observer) {
        observers.append(observer)
    }
    
    func removeObserver(observer: Observer) {
        if let index = observers.firstIndex(where: { $0 === observer }) {
            observers.remove(at: index)
        }
    }
    
    func notifyObservers() {
        for observer in observers {
            observer.update(data: temperature)
        }
    }
    
    func setTemperature(temperature: Double) {
        self.temperature = temperature
        notifyObservers()
    }
}
// Concrete Observer
class Display: Observer {
    func update(data: Any) {
        if let temperature = data as? Double {
            print("Temperature updated: \(temperature)")
        }
    }
}
// Client
let weatherStation = WeatherStation()
let display1 = Display()
let display2 = Display()
weatherStation.registerObserver(observer: display1)
weatherStation.registerObserver(observer: display2)
weatherStation.setTemperature(temperature: 25.0)
weatherStation.setTemperature(temperature: 30.0)
weatherStation.removeObserver(observer: display1)
weatherStation.setTemperature(temperature: 28.0)

11. Singleton Pattern

The Singleton design pattern is a creational pattern in Swift, which ensures that a class only has one instance.

The instance of the class is globally accessible from the whole system. When it’s required for the first time, it uses lazy loading.

The singleton pattern is mostly used for managing global resources. For example, network preferences, user-defined options, caching, etc. only need to have a single instance. After creating it, all other functions of the iOS app can access, manage, and manipulate it.

Note that some people consider the singleton pattern to be an anti-pattern. This is because it breaks certain principles of software development, such as the S.O.L.I.D. principles.

However, it’s important to be familiar with it, since it’s still used in many projects.

When to Use?

To create a single instance of an object and control it globally.

Example

class Singleton {
    static let sharedInstance = Singleton()
    
    private init() {
        // Private initializer to prevent instantiation outside the class
    }
    
    func someMethod() {
        print("Singleton method called")
    }
}
// Usage
let instance1 = Singleton.sharedInstance
let instance2 = Singleton.sharedInstance
print(instance1 === instance2) // Output: true
instance1.someMethod() // Output: "Singleton method called"
instance2.someMethod() // Output: "Singleton method called"

12. Template Method Pattern

The Template Method Pattern is a behavioral design pattern in Swift. As the name suggests, it defines a template of an abstract superclass. Subclasses that use it can override specific parts of the algorithm without changing its structure.

Developers can use this method to implement reusable components with similar behavior.

While using the template method pattern streamlines code writing, debugging, and understanding the flow can sometimes become confusing. You should only use it if you understand the whole structure of the superclass.

When to Use?

To create a template of a superclass and use it in subclasses without changing the structure.

Example

// Abstract class
class DataProcessor {
    // Template method defining the algorithm
    final func process() {
        fetchData()
        processData()
        displayResult()
    }
    
    // Abstract methods to be implemented by subclasses
    func fetchData() {
        fatalError("Subclasses must override fetchData()")
    }
    
    func processData() {
        fatalError("Subclasses must override processData()")
    }
    
    // Concrete method with a default implementation
    func displayResult() {
        print("Displaying result")
    }
}
// Concrete subclass 1
class FileDataProcessor: DataProcessor {
    override func fetchData() {
        print("Fetching data from file")
    }
    
    override func processData() {
        print("Processing data from file")
    }
}
// Concrete subclass 2
class APIDataProcessor: DataProcessor {
    override func fetchData() {
        print("Fetching data from API")
    }
    
    override func processData() {
        print("Processing data from API")
    }
}
// Client
let fileProcessor = FileDataProcessor()
fileProcessor.process()
let apiProcessor = APIDataProcessor()
apiProcessor.process()

13. VIPER Pattern

The VIPER pattern is a complex architectural design pattern often used in iOS app development. The name stands for View, Interactor, Presenter, Entity, and Router.

This pattern separates different components of the code, improving the app’s scalability, testability, and modularity.

Here’s how the code is divided:

  • View: Presents the user interface elements and collects user input.
  • Interactor: Serves as the intermediary between the data layer and the presentation layer.
  • Presenter: Handles communication between the View, Interactor, and Router.
  • Entity: Represents the application’s data model or domain objects.
  • Router: Manages navigation between different screens or modules within the application.

When to Use?

To separate the business logic and achieve modularity, scalability, and testability.

Example

// View
protocol UserViewProtocol: AnyObject {
    func displayUserName(_ name: String)
}
class UserViewController: UIViewController, UserViewProtocol {
    var presenter: UserPresenterProtocol!
    
    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        presenter.viewDidLoad()
    }
    
    func displayUserName(_ name: String) {
        print("User name: \(name)")
    }
}
// Interactor
protocol UserInteractorProtocol {
    func fetchUserName()
}
class UserInteractor: UserInteractorProtocol {
    var presenter: UserPresenterProtocol!
    
    func fetchUserName() {
        // Simulate fetching user name from database or network
        let userName = "John"
        presenter.userNameFetched(userName)
    }
}
// Presenter
protocol UserPresenterProtocol {
    func viewDidLoad()
    func userNameFetched(_ name: String)
}
class UserPresenter: UserPresenterProtocol {
    weak var view: UserViewProtocol?
    var interactor: UserInteractorProtocol!
    
    func viewDidLoad() {
        interactor.fetchUserName()
    }
    
    func userNameFetched(_ name: String) {
        view?.displayUserName(name)
    }
}
// Entity
struct User {
    let name: String
}
// Router
protocol UserRouterProtocol {
    // Define routing methods if needed
}
class UserRouter: UserRouterProtocol {
    // Implement routing methods if needed
}
// Assembly
class UserModuleAssembly {
    static func assembleModule() -> UIViewController {
        let view = UserViewController()
        let presenter = UserPresenter()
        let interactor = UserInteractor()
        let router = UserRouter()
        
        view.presenter = presenter
        presenter.view = view
        presenter.interactor = interactor
        interactor.presenter = presenter
        
        return view
    }
}
// Usage
let userViewController = UserModuleAssembly.assembleModule()

What Factors to Consider When Choosing Design Patterns in Swift?

There are the most essential factors to consider when choosing design patterns in  Swift

When choosing which Swift design patterns to use in your iOS app development process, there are several factors to consider.

Consider the objective of the different iOS design patterns and which of them match your app’s purpose. Each design pattern has upsides and downsides. Explore all of them to make sure you’re using the right ones to solve the current problem.

Additionally, think about the scalability, testability, and maintainability of your iOS app.

And lastly, take into account your team’s expertise. If you’re missing a developer with applicable skills, you can use team augmentation services to fill in the gap.

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Some of the most popular iOS apps that use Swift design patterns include:

  • Instagram: The iOS version of Instagram uses the MVC design pattern.
  • Lyft: The ride app is designed using the Singleton pattern.
  • Evernote: This iOS app makes use of the Observer design pattern.
  • Slack: The productivity application is developed using the Facade design pattern.
  • Airbnb: The iOS version of the app utilizes the Decorator design pattern in Swift.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Which is the hardest design pattern?

The term “hardest” is subjective and depends on the experience of the developers and the project’s scope. With this in mind, developers consider some design patterns to be more challenging and complex than others.

For example, the Composite, State, and Interpreter iOS design patterns are considered difficult to use. Their complexity comes from the complicated relationships between objects and states.

The most widely used architectural pattern is the Model-View-Controller (MVC).

It separates the application into three components: Model, View, and Controller. They’re responsible for different tasks. The Model manages the app’s data and logic. The View deals with the user interface. The Controller handles the communication between the other two.

The clarity of this pattern makes it a preferred choice by iOS developers.

How many design patterns are there in iOS?

Currently, at least 23 recognized classic design patterns exist. They can be divided into three categories by their purpose.

The number of universally recognized design patterns varies. There are a minimum of 6 Creational Design Patterns, 7 Structural Design Patterns, and 10 Behavioral Design Patterns.

These numbers vary due to different classifications, interpretations, or consensus in the developer community.

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